A Return to Homesteading

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Jill (The Real Food Forager)

Jill (The Real Food Forager) › As a Clinical Nutritionist/Chiropractor with a specialty in SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) and GAPS (Gut ...

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I am fascinated by the Homestead Movement. Young educated people are forsaking their corporate jobs, leaving the cities, buying land and going back to traditional lifestyles. I get envious when I see this and read how these people have learned how to farm the land, take care of animals and then reap the benefits of having their own local food supply. This is a major lifestyle change. What motivates them, I wonder?

I read an interesting article about this very issue. It spoke about young entrepreneurs going into farming for two reasons. One was the impetus to leave the rat race of the corporate world, the other was a realization that the demand for local organic food is growing and may be profitable enough to live on.

Organic farming CAN feed the world

In a previous post called 12 Reasons Why Organic Farming CAN Feed the World,  I reviewed the “Farm Systems Analysis Trial.” This is a thirty year study of organic farming conducted by the highly respected Rodale Institute.

Their findings suggest that organic farming is superior to conventional systems in “building, maintaining and replenishing the health of the soil.” In addition to soil health, the Institute’s trials looked at economic viability, energy usage, and human health and concluded that organic agriculture is more sustainable than conventional. Some of the Institute’s findings were:

  • Organic outperforms conventional in years of drought.
  • Organic farming systems build rather than deplete soil organic matter, making it a more sustainable system.
  • Organic farming uses 45% less energy and is more efficient.
  • Conventional systems produce 40% more greenhouse gases.
  • Organic farming systems are more profitable than conventional.
  • The big picture is that organic farming appears to be a much better system for growing food in all of the aspects that were studied. A lot of young people are turning to this model of sustainability and creating small farms that can feed local communities and add to the local economy.

The big picture is that organic farming appears to be a much better system for growing food in all of the aspects that were studied. A lot of young people are turning to this model of sustainability and creating small farms that can feed local communities and add to the local economy.

Click here to read the rest of the article over on RealFoodForager.com!

This article originally appeared on RealFoodForager.com. It is partially posted here with permission of the author.

Photo Credit: Carpe Diem Acreage